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Chuck Becht

Dr. Becht, Fellow ASME, former Chairman of the ASME B31.3, Process Piping Code, is a recognized authority in pressure vessels, piping, expansion joints, and elevated temperature design. He has more than 40 years of experience in design, design review, analysis, check-out, mechanical integrity, development, troubleshooting, and failure analysis.  He has been a member of 14 Codes and Standards committees, five of which he has chaired.

He has more than 60 publications including two books (on B31.3 and B31.1 piping) and seven patents and is a frequent speaker and chairman in technical forums. He received the ASME Dedicated Service Award in 2001 and was the recipient of the 2009 ASME Pressure Vessel and Piping Medal and the 2014 J. Hall Taylor Medal. He is President of Becht Engineering Co., Inc, CEO of Helidex, LLC, and Director/Owner of Sonomatic Ltd.

When Should the Rules for Severe Cyclic Conditions (Service) in ASME B31.3 Be Used?

process_piping_ASME_B31
This posting (November 2019) is an update to an October 2013 post which reflects changes to the ASME B31.3 Code relative to severe cyclic service that have occurred since the original post. There has been a fair amount of confusion as to when the rules for severe cyclic conditions in ASME B31.3 should be used, and the rules themselves can be somewhat confusing to apply. In the 2016 edition of ASME B31.3 the definition of when the rules for severe cyclic service are applicable were changed, which may reduce the confusion.  The definition as to when the rules of severe cyclic apply is in the 300.2, Definitions.  Prior to the 2016 edition, it stated that severe cyclic conditions are: Conditions applying to specific piping components or joints in which SE computed in accordance with para. 319.4.4 exceeds 0.8SA (as defined in para. 302.3.5); and The equivalent number of cycles (N in...
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Recent Comments
Guest — Hafiz Ali Alvi

Impact on Wall thickness for C...

Dear Mr. Becht, I would like to ask what could be possible impact of cyclic service for the calculated pipe wall thickness under p... Read More
Saturday, 16 November 2019 23:59
Chuck Becht

Impact on Wall thickness for C...

Designation of a system as being in severe cyclic service does not impact the wall thickness calculations for pressure design. No... Read More
Sunday, 17 November 2019 07:40
Guest — MK

SE calculation

Dear Mr.Becht, My understanding is that the calculation of SE (for comparing to 0.8SA in the evaluation) should include only the d... Read More
Thursday, 08 August 2019 02:03
Chuck Becht

SE Calc

SE with E as a subscript is defined as displacement stress range and includes only displacement stresses. Note that the most rece... Read More
Thursday, 08 August 2019 07:27
Guest — MK

Thanks

Thanks very much for the reply
Thursday, 08 August 2019 07:43
Guest — Hilario Quiring

APWHT - Rev 2

Dear Mr Becht We have P4 materials which was 4x PWHTed due to repair result after NDT. *IS THIS APPLICABLE IN ASME B31.3? *CO... Read More
Sunday, 23 September 2018 03:36
Chuck Becht

info request

This appears to be a request for consulting services. Rather than making a blog post, if you are interested in consulting service... Read More
Sunday, 23 September 2018 13:49
Guest — Hilario Quiring

PWHT

Dear Mr Becht, We have P4 materials which was 4x PWHTed due to repair result after NDT. *IS THIS APPLICABLE? Thanks Could yo... Read More
Saturday, 22 September 2018 09:13
Chuck Becht

info request

This appears to be a request for consulting services. Rather than making a blog post, if you are interested in consulting service... Read More
Sunday, 23 September 2018 13:49
Guest — Hilario Quiring

asme b31.3

differentiate normal fluid service to severe cyclic
Thursday, 20 September 2018 08:09
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Elastic Follow-up Can Result in Failures in Systems that Comply with Piping Code Rules

piping_results_elastic_followup1 Cracking In Reduced Diameter Region Caused By Elastic Follow-up
The analysis procedures in the Code essentially assume that the strain range in the system can be determined from an elastic analysis. That is, strains are proportional to elastically calculated stresses. The stress range is limited to less than two times the yield stress, in part to achieve this. However, in some systems, strain concentration or elastic follow-up occurs. A typical concern in refinery systems is hot walled sections in otherwise refractory lined piping systems, where thermal expansion loading has resulted in cracking in the hot walled section although it complied with the basic code acceptance criteria. As an example, consider a cantilevered pipe with a portion adjacent to the fixed end constructed with a reduced-diameter or -thickness pipe or lower-yield-strength material that has the free end laterally displaced. The elastic analysis assumes that strains will be distributed in the system in accordance with the elastic stiffnesses. However, consider what happens...
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Guest — pritti sinha

piping designing

Extremely very useful tips for us!!! very inciteful. I’m just leaving the comment to appreciate your efforts in disseminating the ... Read More
Friday, 23 November 2018 05:12
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Fluid Catalytic Cracking (FCC) Transfer Line Flexibility - Analysis and Design Considerations

fcc-3images-ppt
FCC’s are complex units - and the design of their transfer lines has some unique considerations.   While many of the lines are refractory lined to permit construction with carbon steel piping, some sections are hot walled, at temperatures well into the creep range, for the purpose of balancing thermal expansion or, in the case of piping between the final catalyst separations device and flue gas expanders, to prevent dislodged chunks of refractory from being drawn into and damaging the expander.  Below are some critical considerations: The stiffness of the piping and resultant loads on equipment are affected by the presence of internal refractory . The composite action of the steel pipe and refractory needs to be considered.  Note that this is not simply including the refractory as a monolithic element, since the refractory will have shrinkage cracks.  There is a paper by T Chadda on an approach that can be...
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Reduced Toughness Properties of Some Modern Carbon Steels Create Brittle Fracture Risk

Reduced Toughness Properties of Some Modern Carbon Steels Create Brittle Fracture Risk
Changes in steelmaking practice are reported to be causing some carbon steel piping components that are assumed by ASME Codes to behave in a ductile manner at ambient temperatures, to behave instead in a brittle manner.  Barry Messer from Fluor made a presentation on this subject at the Spring 2016 meeting of the ASME B31.3, Process Piping Code Committee to alert committee members to this issue.   Having steel components that behave in a ductile fashion is an important aspect in the safety of pressure equipment.   ASME B31.3 requires impact testing to confirm ductile behavior unless the material is exempted from such testing by various code rules.  These exemption rules have been based on the historic properties of the materials.   A105 carbon steel flanges are generally exempted down to -20°F (-29°C) as is A106 Gr B carbon steel pipe with a wall thickness ½ inch (13 mm) and less.  The issue has...
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Guest — Deepak Mahadeshwar

Thank you for sharing

Very useful! Thank you for sharing.
Friday, 21 September 2018 03:19
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