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Dave has worked in the petrochemical, nuclear and power industries over the last 16 years. Dave’s specialties include finite element analysis (FEA - heat transfer/thermal-stress, creep, fracture and shock and vibration), fatigue, fracture and creep modeling, as well as computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and multiphysics problems. 

He is a long time member of ASME (Sections I, III and VIII) and API committees, as well as AWS (weld residual stress modeling).  Dave lives in the Cleveland, Ohio area. where he works out of the Medina, Ohio office.

CFD Modeling of a Mixing Tee – Part 1: Model Validation

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by Dave Dewees, Zumao Chen and L. Magnus Gustafsson This 2-part blog deals with CFD modeling of a mixing tee that is often found in industry. Traditional simulation is validated against experiment, as well as a new commercially available method that offers the possibility of substantial solution time reduction.  In fact, the new method is shown to give accurate results in a much shorter computer time than the traditional analysis, allowing much more rapid turnaround of difficult problems such as the turbulent mixing behavior of industrial mixing tees. When there is a large temperature difference between two fluid streams, large temperature fluctuations can occur, which can lead to thermal fatigue of the piping system, even at “steady-state” bulk flow conditions. Advanced CFD modeling is capable of predicting these fluid temperature fluctuations at the mix point, as well as characterizing the corresponding temperature variations in the pipe wall itself. Specifically, large eddy simulation...
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CFD Modeling of a Mixing Tee – Part 2: Predictions of Temperature Fluctuations

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by Dave Dewees, Zumao Chen and L. Magnus Gustafsson Miss Part 1? Click Here This is the second part of a 2-part blog.  In Part 1, the stress-blended eddy simulation (SBES) and large eddy simulation (LES) approaches for simulating turbulence have been validated against test data obtained from a mixing tee. In this part, the SBES approach is used to predict temperature fluctuations in a mixing tee where light gas oil mixes with a recycled gas.  Depending on the characteristics of the streams being mixed (momentum and temperature), protection from rapid temperature variations occurring even at steady-state bulk flow conditions is a necessity. While a CFD model can predict these temperature variations with good fidelity as shown in Part 1 of this blog, once a problem is found, the same CFD model can also be used to design solutions that protect the piping at the mix point.  Here thermal sleeve length...
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Grade 91 Steel - How Did We Get Here? Part 1

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This blog is the first part of a 3-blog series. To view the rest of the story click HERE for Part 2 and Here for Part 3 . Part 1: History Thirty years ago, Grade 91 (9Cr-1Mo-V) steel was hailed as the savior of the power generation industry [1]; now it’s behavior has been described as too variable to ensure safe operation [2].  What happened?  At the same time Grade 91 was being developed in the late 1970’s for high temperature nuclear reactor application [3], power plants that had been designed and operated as base-loaded were suddenly cycled on a regular basis.  The standard material for high temperature steam outlet headers was first 1¼Cr–½Mo (Grade 11) and later 2¼Cr–1Mo (Grade 22); in both cases headers rapidly began to experience severe cracking in and between header penetrations.  The cracking was termed “ligament cracking” [4] and by the mid-1980’s had become a complex...
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Grade 91 Steel - How Did We Get Here? Part 2

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Read Part 1 Part 2: Type IV Cracking and Inspectability The current concerns with Grade 91 are fundamentally and firmly rooted in inspectability of Type IV damage; while sensitivity of the material can be managed (see for example [1]), Type IV cracking is perhaps the Achilles heel of Grade 91.  At a high level, the thermal cycle(s) due to welding will create a thin band of material in the heat affected zone (HAZ) with properties much closer to Grade 9 than Grade 91.  While full re-normalization and tempering of the entire component after welding can greatly improve the situation, simple (subcritical) post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) does not.  Damage is overwhelmingly concentrated in this thin band of material during high temperature operation, such that when failure finally occurs, it has an almost brittle appearance since there has been little if any creep deformation or damage outside of the HAZ (see Figure 3...
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