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George Antaki, Fellow ASME, has over 40 years of experience in nuclear power plants and process facilities, in the areas of design, safety analysis, startup, operation support, inspection, fitness for services and integrity analysis, retrofits and repairs. George has held engineering and management positions at Westinghouse and Washington Group International, where he has performed work at power and process plants, and consulted for the Department of Energy (DOE), the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI).

Design Rules for the Prevention of Failures by Fatigue in ASME B31 and ASME III

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A Seminal Publication...In the history of the ASME B31 pressure piping codes (and ASME III Div.1), there is a handful of publications that have set the design rules for generations to come. One such publication is A.R.C. Markl’s “Piping-Flexibility Analysis”, Transactions of the ASME, February 1955.Other publications by Markl and his associates are listed here, but the 1955 publication is where the design rules were fully set and explained:Fatigue Tests of Welding Elbows vs. Miter Bends - A.R.C. Markl, 1947Fatigue Tests of Flanged Assemblies - A.R.C. Markl and H.H. George, 1949Fatigue Tests of Piping Components - A.R.C. Markl, 1951Piping Flexibility Analysis - A.R.C. Markl, 1953Why Branch Connections Fail - A.R.C. Markl, E.C. Rodabaugh and H.H. George, 1955Effects of Internal Pressure on Flexibility - E.C. Rodabaugh and H.H. George, 1956Balanced Quality as a means of Attaining Maximum Economic Safety for Critical Piping - A.R.C. Markl, 1957Fabricated Pressure Piping as Related to Nuclear...
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Guest — Ron Haupt

Good, clear blog

The Markl "Piping-Flexibility Analysis" paper is the one technical paper regarding piping design that should be read by all piping... Read More
Wednesday, 25 March 2020 13:49
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Roadmap For Repair of Buried Pipe

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The repair of a corroded, damaged, or leaking buried pipe should be approached in a well-structured manner. Here is a roadmap to the repair options for buried steel pipes, with the corresponding brief commentary.1. Open trench repair1.1 New line, replacing the existing line (or segment). Determine whether to use the same material, or a higher alloy, or HDPE, or fiberglass for the new pipe.1.1.1 Same trench as existing line, either cut-out and replace the old line, or abandon in-place the old line and place the new line next to or above the abandoned existing line. Caution with new line near old one if there is cathodic protection.1.1.2 Wet (hot) tap and bypass, installing a new bypass either above ground or buried.1.1.2.1 Welded tap, if the old line has sufficient remaining wall to be weldable.1.1.2.2 Clamped tap, using a bolted full-encirclement clamp with a nozzle, instead of a welded wet (hot) tap.1.2...
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Operability And Fitness-for-Service (FFS) Of ASME Equipment In Nuclear Power Plants

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Bringing Order and Logic to the Evaluation ProcessThere is a multitude of documents and reports that describe the damage mechanisms of ASME pressure equipment (vessels, pumps, valves, piping, and tanks, and their supports) in nuclear power plants. Thousands of pages published by EPRI, the NRC, ASME, NACE, research laboratories, utilities, contractors, and others, to read, study, and understand.The plant engineer must understand these thousands of pages of damage mechanisms, first to take the right preventive measures, and second, when the damage occurs despite our best efforts, to correctly diagnose the remaining life of the equipment, i.e. determine its fitness-for-service, its operability.In December 2018, EPRI published “Roadmap to Integrity Evaluation and Repair of Nuclear Plant Piping” EPRI report number 3002013156, to help the plant engineer navigate through the technical and regulatory complexities of damage mechanisms and the methods for the evaluation of remaining life. This is an important step in bringing order...
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Evaluation of Degraded and Nonconforming Conditions For ASME III and B31.1 and B31.7 Class 2 and Class 3 Pressure Boundary Nuclear Plant Components

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1.   Definitions1.1    Degraded ConditionA degraded condition as defined in NRC Inspection Manual 0326 Paragraph 03.02: “A degraded condition is one in which the qualification of an SSC or its functional capability is reduced. Examples of degraded conditions are failures, malfunctions, deficiencies, deviations, and defective material and equipment. Examples of conditions that can reduce the capability of a system are aging, erosion, corrosion, improper operation, and maintenance.”1.2    Nonconforming ConditionA nonconforming condition as defined in US NRC Inspection Manual 0326 Paragraph 03.06: “A nonconforming condition is a condition of an SSC that involves a failure to meet the CLB or a situation in which quality has been reduced because of factors such as improper design, testing, construction, or modification. The following are examples of nonconforming conditions: An SSC fails to conform to one or more applicable codes or standards (e.g., the CFR, operating license, TSs, UFSAR, and/or licensee commitments). An as-built or as-modified...
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