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Becht Engineering Blog

In this section of the site contributing authors submit interesting articles relating to the various services, industries and research & development efforts of Becht Engineering.

CFD Analysis with Scale Model Verification - A Proven Cost-Effective Approach

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Contributing Authors - Dave Dewees (Becht) and Dr. Keith Kirkpatrick (McHale Performance)  Reducing HRSG & Stack Pressure Drop to Improve Profitability Many operating Simple and Combined Cycle HRSG (Heat Recovery Steam Generator) ducts and stack exhaust system designs can be optimized to reduce pressure drop, improve combustion turbine backpressure, improve performance and increase revenue.  CFD analysis with Scale Model Verification is a proven and cost-effective tool for quantifying recoverable performance loss and improving generation plant profitability. Combustion Turbine exhaust/HRSG/SCR ductwork, breeching and stack systems require careful attention during detailed engineering and design. While EPC Contracts typically include both performance guarantees and liquidated damage provisions which are highly dependent on Combustion Turbine backpressure, the design of this critical stack system is many times “farmed out” to 3 rd party stack, HRSG or other less qualified suppliers. This practice can result in an un-optimized design with higher than necessary pressure drop resulting in reduced...
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Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Confirms Cause of Deaerator Cracking

Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Confirms Cause of Deaerator Cracking
CFD was used to confirm that poor design of the steam inlet nozzle was the main contributor to deaerator head to shell weld cracking, and confirmed proposed design improvements.  This recent Becht project illustrates one of the causes of deaerator cracking. A through-wall crack had been found at the head-to-shell junction at the steam inlet end of the drum. This crack was attributed to corrosion fatigue, a common occurrence in deaerators. The crack was most likely initiated at a weld surface defect on the I.D. of the drum and grew with time. The daily operating cycles of the drum during periods of reduced steam demand and thermal stresses which we attributed to a poorly designed steam inlet nozzle were the main contributors to the crack growth.   A large diameter superheated steam inlet nozzle extended through the head of the drum terminating 18” into the vessel. The steam exited through a...
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