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Becht Engineering Blog

In this section of the site contributing authors submit interesting articles relating to the various services, industries and research & development efforts of Becht Engineering.

Why do Clamped Connections With Metallic Seals Sometimes Leak?

cover-pipe-clamp
Clamp connections with metallic seals can offer superior joint integrity over traditional flanged connections but caution must be exercised regarding the service conditions, especially when cyclic thermal loading is present. This blog post highlights aspects of a clamp connection analysis performed by Becht Engineering. The client had observed significant loss of bolt preload at several clamp connections installed in a refinery process unit where the fluid temperature regularly fluctuated by 700 o F. The client attempted to counteract the bolt preload loss by re-torqueing any bolts that showed a torque reduction from the initially applied torque only to find that, after a period during which thermal cycles occurred, the preload was again reduced. A typical clamp arrangement is seen in Figure 1 (with parts labeled). After reviewing the installation and service conditions, it was hypothesized that the cause of the bolt preload loss could be the differential thermal growth of the...
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Magnus Gustafsson

Re: Belleville Springs

Fran, No, we did not look at Belleville washers as part of this work. I do expect they would help, but I understand the preferred... Read More
Thursday, 04 April 2019 14:18
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Rigging Points Of Attachment - A Critical Element of Heavy Lift

cover-image Rigging Points In Heavy Lifts Are Critical
Review of rigging attachments to the equipment being lifted have prevented lift failures.  When planning major crane lifts we are very careful about confirming the crane foundation, rigging stability/capacity, and crane capacity. Are we taking enough time to analyze the points of attachment for the rigging? Becht Engineering Heavy Lift Division says “NO”. Our experience is that reviews of rigging points of attachment have identified critical flaws that may have resulted in dropped loads. In industry today, the load/vessel designers typically design the lifting lugs and trunnions at the same time. It is our experience that the owners of the equipment and the crane contractors are assuming these devices are properly designed and rated. It is a common practice that the crane contractor assumes responsibility for rigging above the points of attachment. Generally, the consensus is that trunnions and lift lugs are designed by others and they should be right. That...
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Basics of Design By Analysis in ASME Section VIII, Division 2

fea-pressure-vessel-nozzl_20181115-174743_1
How hard can it be?  I’ve heard from several (unnamed) analysts that because they have access to an FEA program and have successfully applied FEA in other fields, that FEA for pressure vessels should be a snap.  What is it about FEA for pressure vessels that makes it unique? I was recently discussing with another blogger regarding some distinctive aspects of performing Design By Analysis for pressure vessels.  We generated several questions, and so I decided to post this in a Question & Answer format. When do I have to use FEA in my pressure vessel design? The short answer here is that for most situations, you probably should not be using FEA to design your pressure vessel.  The rules for designing pressure vessels in ASME Section VIII, Division 1 and ASME Section VIII, Division 2 have a long history of successful application.  So, wherever possible, I would recommend that you...
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How To Quantify And Evaluate Oil Storage Tank Annular Plate Corrosion

annular_plates_cover-imag_20181008-172036_1 Failure of Oil Storage Tank Annular Plate
In the past ten years, there have been a few oil storage tank annular plate failures due to soil side corrosion and fatigue loading (filling and emptying) which has led to large spills. The corrosion tends to be localized in a groove fashion and the size of the flaw could vary from 3 feet to 12 feet in the circumferential direction. The location of the corrosion is also where the highest bending stress will occur during filling and emptying of tanks. See Figures 1 and 2 for the location of the failure on the annular plate.   Since the location of failure is under the tank, the corrosion flaws cannot be detected easily from the outside of the tank. It can only be detected if an internal inspection is done which would require the tank to be emptied and cleaned and this is very expensive. However, with UT shear wave technology...
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