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Becht Engineering Blog

In this section of the site contributing authors submit interesting articles relating to the various services, industries and research & development efforts of Becht Engineering.

George Antaki, Fellow ASME, has over 40 years of experience in nuclear power plants and process facilities, in the areas of design, safety analysis, startup, operation support, inspection, fitness for services and integrity analysis, retrofits and repairs. George has held engineering and management positions at Westinghouse and Washington Group International, where he has performed work at power and process plants, and consulted for the Department of Energy (DOE), the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI).

Evaluation of Corroded Pipe in Accordance with ASME B&PV Code Section XI - A Comparison of the Three Code Cases

Evaluation of Corroded Pipe in Accordance with ASME B&PV Code Section XI -
A Comparison of the Three Code Cases
The evaluation of wall thinning corrosion in steel pipes is addressed in three ASME XI code cases: N-513, N-597, and N-806. I have no ambition here other than to summarize in a table the differences between these three code cases. A brief commentary follows the table. The brief commentary... Line A – While these are Section XI Code Cases applicable to ASME III Class 2 and 3, technically, nothing would prevent from applying these Code Cases for B31.1 piping. Line B – There is no technical basis for limiting N-513 to moderate energy lines, i.e. pressure at or below 275 psi and (“or”, depending on the plant vintage) temperature at or below 200oF, other than the understandable reluctance to operate with hot water flashing to steam through a pinhole leak. Line D – It can be confusing that N-513 includes fracture mechanics consideration because it attempts to address cracks (so-called...
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Repair of Pressure Equipment and Piping in Nuclear Power Plants- Navigating ASME XI Repairs with PCC-2 as a Roadmap

Repair of Pressure Equipment and Piping in Nuclear Power Plants-
Navigating ASME XI Repairs with PCC-2 as a Roadmap
Download/View as PDF Summary - This article assists engineers in selecting ASME XI options for the repair of ASME III nuclear components. In summary, the repair options in ASME XI are dispersed throughout Section XI and Code Cases, while, in contrast, the ASME PCC-2 repair standard (for non-safety related components) lists repair options in a well-structured manner. So, we are going to use the structure of ASME PCC-2 as a road map to cross-correlate the equivalent ASME XI repair, where it exists. Therefore, the Table can be used as a checklist to remind engineers of the many repair options. On one hand …. ASME XI : The repair of safety-related Class 1, 2, and 3 nuclear components is addressed in ASME Boiler & Pressure Vessel Code Section XI and in a series of ASME XI Code Cases. The use of ASME XI and its Code Cases to select a repair...
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Environmentally-Assisted Fatigue (EAF) in Nuclear Power Plants

Environmentally-Assisted Fatigue (EAF) in Nuclear Power Plants
Before we tackle environmentally-assisted fatigue (EAF), what is fatigue? In ASME Boiler & Pressure Vessel Section III Division 1, Subsection NB (in short, ASME III NB) fatigue refers to the damage caused by systems and components as a result of cyclic loads. The qualification of the primary coolant system of light water reactors (ASME III Class 1 components) must address the fatigue damage caused by pressure and thermal cycling of the equipment and piping during their design life. How is fatigue life analysed and qualified for 40 years, 60 years, or more of service? The fatigue analysis and qualification is achieved by following a procedure outlined in ASME III Div.1 Subsection NB for Class 1 piping and components. This procedure can be outlined in five key steps: STEP-1 TRANSIENTS : Developing the thermal and pressure transients, in the form of time-dependent functions P i (t) and T i (t). For...
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Equipment Nozzle Loads

Equipment Nozzle Loads
by Greg Hollinger and George Antaki One of the qualification requirements for a piping system is to keep the loads imparted by the piping on equipment nozzles within certain allowable limits. These loads consist of sets of three forces and three moments, for the various load combinations. There are basically two types of nozzle load limits: (1) nozzle loads applied to active equipment, and (2) nozzle loads applied to passive equipment. Active Equipment Nozzle Loads Active mechanical equipment consist of equipment with moving parts, such as pumps, compressors, and fans. The pipe nozzle load limits are developed by the equipment manufacturer and are intended to prevent malfunction, such as shaft misalignment, or distortion of the casing that could impede the movement of impellers. These limits are typically based on actual testing of the equipment, and not on analysis. Some standards have published standard pump nozzle loads, but these are only valid...
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